Inside

Craufurdland Castle, a traditional Scottish castle offering self-catering accommodation for up to 16 guests.

Home to the Craufurds of Craufurdland since 1245, Craufurdland Castle is now split into two apartments, the Tower House, a luxury self-catering apartment for up to 16 people, and the Laird’s House, where the current laird lives.

The Hall

This is a classic Norman barrel vault room, which is on the ground floor of the 14th century Tower House. The entrance doorway and window in the hall were both formed in the 1980’s when the castle was split into two houses. The door at the far end now takes you to the kitchen and dining room; it was originally the foot of the spiral stairs added to the tower, probably in the 15th century.

The Kitchen

Architecturally, few kitchens can boast more unusual windows. The owners of the castle have tried to make this house a 'home from home' and, as such, kitted out the kitchen with all the tools of a cook’s kitchen. You should find everything you need in the kitchen, including all your herbs and spices etc. If you can’t find anything you need, the castle owners will be happy to assist.

The Dining Room

Please don’t let the laird's ancestors put you off your food; they’re good sorts really. The table will take up to 16 and with that many voices and laughs, how can you not enjoy the food, drink and merriment?

The Drawing Room

This is a beautiful Georgian drawing room with exquisite cornicing and 10 foot high windows, looking over Craufurdland Water below. The large marble fireplace keeps things nice and cosy.

This room has ample space and seating for everyone in the house to gather. The large fireplace will keep you warm, whilst yet more ancestors on the walls keep an eye on proceedings. By all accounts they enjoyed the house too, so will watch with envy.

The Wallace Suite

This is a split level room and has two small sofa-beds on the lower level, with access to the en-suite bathroom. The upper level is accessed via cast-iron spiral stairs, leading to the mezzanine, with a super-king size bed, dressing table, and arm-chair, plus stunning views over the front lawn through the four Gothic stained glass windows.

The King James

This room is on the first floor of the original tower and is accessed three quarters of the way up the stairs. It can be made up as a twin or double room. The room has a toilet in one cubby, a sink in another, and a beautiful roll-top bath in one of the recessed windows. One of the other windows, which has been bricked up many years ago, now has a beautiful mirror window, making a stunning and unique dressing-table.

The Knights' Room

This room, on the second floor of the tower, is accessed via the spiral stairs, and would have been the ‘Laird’s Room’. This bedroom is a twin/double room, with its own wash-hand basin and small walk-in shower.

The Bard's Room

This room is the additional room for the house. The room provides emergency access to the stairs of the ‘Laird’s House’ part of the castle. This room is a twin/double room, with its own en-suite bathroom. A large window gives views over the back lawn and the ‘statue’ in the grounds.

The Queen Mary Room

This recently renovated room boasts a beautiful Mahogany four-poster bed and new en-suite bathroom. Bright and airy, this room has three windows overlooking the front lawn, one with a 16th century stained glass panel and a fourth window looking towards the tower.

The Garret

Situated on top of the 14th century tower, The Garret is a great room, looking out over the battlements. Reached via the stone spiral stairs, this pitched ceiling room is a traditional space in all tower houses, which are known as garrets. Warm in the winter and cool in the summer, this beautiful room is decorated with Crawford tartan. It is truly unique. Whether used by kids to get away from the adults, or a couple who want their privacy, this lovely room is always a popular choice.